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British Pattern 1821 Artillery Officer’s Sword of Brigadier General Herbert de Toufreville Phillips

The Royal Artillery Sword of Brigadier General Herbert de Toufreville Phillips. This sword is remarkable for a few reasons, firstly that it is the sword of a high-ranking and interesting officer, who served in various campaigns from the 1880s to WW1. It is also a rare product of George Thurkle’s workshop and while the sword dates to the 1880s, the etching and plating appears to have been applied after 1919, with Phillips’ ‘battle honours’ added towards the later stages of his career. The start and end dates (1881-1919) are etched on the blade above the active service dates, as well Phillips’ initials in a cartouche.

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British Pattern 1845 Infantry Officer’s Sword

Having a shagreen and copper wire grip, steeped and ball end pommel, brass half basket Gothic style hilt with Royal Cipher, decorative backstrap, forward facing quillon, fullered single edged blade with double edged tip, etched design with royal cipher, ricasso having star of David to one side and the other having makers ’ E. Thurkle Maker Soho London ’ along with the steel scabbard with hanging loops. Measures; 102 cm.

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British Pattern 1919 Royal Air Force Officer’s Sword

A Royal Air Force Officer’s Sword
82.5cm blade etched with the Royal Arms, RAF badge, vacant panels and foliage, regulation gilt hilt incorporating GRV cypher, eagle head pommel, wire bound fish skin covered grip, in its leather scabbard, with gilt mounts, complete with sword knot of gold and blue strap and bullion acorn.

The RAF Officer’s Sword shares design elements with the Pattern 1897 Infantry Officer’s Sword. The hilt design is nearly the same, except for the RAF emblem on the guard and the hilt material, which is brass. The blade is that of the P1897 Infantry Officer’s Sword, but with RAF motifs etched on the blade.

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British Pattern 1845 Infantry Officer’s Sword for New South Wales Military Forces, c.1870

Pattern 1845 Infantry Officer’s sword and scabbard. The hilt has a brass half basket three bar guard with the cartouche badge of New South Wales. The grip is fishskin bound with copper wire and there is a gold with red stripes sword knot attached to the guard. The thin levee style, slightly curved blade has a single fuller to each side to within eleven inches of the spear point and is etched for half the length on both sides with a floral design. In the centre right on the blade is the coat of arms of New South Wales and on the left centre is a crown over the VR cypher. The ricasso is marked E THURKLE MAKER SOHO LONDON. The brass scabbard has two loose hanger rings on bands at 2 and 10.5 inches from the throat. The remains of a hanger strap is attached to the top ring.

This sword is a levee style and was more than likely used by Major (later Colonel) Bartlett when he was adjutant to the Third Australian Regiment in the 1890’s.

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An Extremely Fine Rifle Officer’s Presentation Sword

83cm blade by J. & W. Wood, Cutlers, Manchester, finely etched with foliage, stands of arms, crowned VR cypher, the Arms of Stockport, slung bugle horn, Prince of Wales feathers, recipient’s crest and arms and presentation inscription, the gilt patent solid hilt, the guard cast and pierced with foliage, Prince of Wales feathers, the unit title of The Stockport Rifle Volunteers Fourth Battn Cheshire, around the Arms of Stockport, the Royal cypher, a slung bugle horn and the recipient’s crest, the back-piece cast with laurels, oak leaves and acorns and a classical helmet, wire bound chequered horn grips, in its gilt scabbard with large gilt mounts embossed with foliage and panels of trophies of arms against a stippled matted ground, two suspension rings, complete with its blue and gold bullion sword and knot.

The inscriptions reads: Presented to Major Coppock, By His Late Company The First Stockport or XVIIth Cheshire Rifle Volunteers, May 4th 1861.
HENRY COPPOCK appointed Captain when the 17th (Stockport) Company was formed 10 March 1860. Upon the formation of the 4th Administrative Battalion, Cheshire Rifle Volunteers 20 November 1860, he was appointed Major (though with a Captain’s rank), a position he held until his death in 1870.

He was born in 1806 in Stockport and became a lawyer. Upon the formation of Stockport Borough in 1835 he was appointed Town Clerk, and served the town through the troubled times of the Chartists Riots and other insurrections.

He fathered 12 children and resided at Daw Bank House, Stockport. He died in 1870. His ‘family’ arms/crest appear to be his own invention. The Arms for Stockport as shown on the sword are still in use, though they were not Granted until 1932.

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British Pattern 1796 Infantry Officer’s Sword

The blade of this spadroon features the remains of blue and gilt decoration, with some of the gilding remaining, as well as extensive acid etched motifs, which are still clear and go a long way up the blade beyond the blued area. The blade is in nice condition and solid in the hilt. The hilt overall is in good condition, in good shape and the folding drop fully functioning. The double-shell guard is rather loose, due to the loss of the leather washer (which could be reinstated fairly easily, using a split washer), but the rest of the hilt is tight and secure. This was the regulation sword carried by the majority of British infantry officers through the Napoleonic Wars from 1796 and up until 1822.

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