victoriansword:

British Pattern 1845 Infantry Officer’s Sword

An extremely rare Victorian infantry sergeant’s sword by Wilkinson, in fine condition. I have never seen a comparable example and this sword raises many questions. The form of the blade (fullered, but with a quill point) was normal to sergeants’ swords of the 1850-1880 period. Yet those are usually plain, whereas this is etched like an officer’s sword. But it is not numbered, as a private purchase officer’s sword would be. It does not have a proof slug, but rather an etched proof mark (presumably because you cannot safety drill a proof slug hole in this type of blade). The guard is in brass and gilded, with a folding inner drop, like an officer’s sword of pre-1860. So, what this is precisely remains open to research – if I were to make an educated guess, I would say that it was either a presentation sergeant’s sword, or a private purchase sergeant’s sword for a sergeant with money to spare. But that does not answer the question of why it is not numbered. Condition wise it is really very good – the blade is mostly bright, with contrasting frost etching, firm in the hilt. The guard is in very good shape with pretty complete gilding and the drop works well. The shagreen is still very dark and in great condition, as is the grip wire. A fantastic sword and it feels great in the hand also – very nimble and lively.

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victoriansword:

British Pattern 1895 Infantry Officer’s Levée

Sword

This example appears to be a levée or picquet weight sword for dress rather than a sword intended for active service.

Picquet weight swords, sometimes called

levée

swords, were light weight versions of service swords and were not intended for combat.

Here is an example of a cased set of swords; one for service, one for dress.

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