useless-catalanfacts:

Some photos taken in 1943 and 1944 of the prisoners of the Modelo jail in Barcelona (Catalonia) being forced to take part in Catholic religious acts in the early years of the fascist national-Catholic dictatorship of Spain led by general Franco.

Thousands of these inmates were political prisoners, taken for having fought against the fascist coup or for their activism before the war. Religion was one of the main pillars of the fascist dictatorship, who saw Catalans and leftists in general (what the fascists called rojo-separatistas: “separatists-reds” in Spanish) as dangerous Godless criminal atheists and radical anti-clericals.

Religion was used as another weapon to punish them by forcing them to take part in Catholic masses and a program of national-Catholic re-education.

Outside of prisons, the Catholic religion was mandatory, too. Everyone had to be baptised and do the catechesis and communion, marry through the church (any previous marriage done outside of the Catholic church was not considered valid and their children legally bastards), the Catholic church had a huge power in the dictatorship’s government and control in education, and influence in the public morale and permitted behaviour.

Photos from the Arxiu Municipal de Barcelona.

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workingclasshistory:

On this day, 5 August 1939, 56 people including 13 women and girls, known as the 13 Roses, were executed en masse by the right-wing regime of general Francisco Franco. They were lined up against the walls of the Eastern cemetery in Madrid and shot. 15 of them were legally minors, which was under 21 at that time. Most of those killed were members of the Unified Socialist Youth, trying to rebuild the organisation underground following the defeat of the democratically elected Republic in the Spanish civil war. They were just some of some tens of thousands of people executed in an orgy of violent revenge by the right after Franco’s victory. The 13 Roses’ names were Ana López Gallego, Victoria Muñoz García, Martina Barroso García, Virtudes González García, Luisa Rodríguez de la Fuente, Elena Gil Olaya, Dionisia Manzanero Sala, Joaquina López Laffite, Carmen Barrero Aguado, Pilar Bueno Ibáñez, Blanca Brisac Vázquez, Adelina García Casillas and Julia Conesa Conesa. Conesa wrote a final letter to her family: “Mother, dear mother, I’m going to join my sister and father in the other world, but keep in mind that I’m dying as an honest person. Goodbye, beloved mother, goodbye forever. Your daughter who will never be able to kiss you or hug you anymore. Don’t cry for me. May my name not be erased from history.” Learn more about the civil war and the subsequent repression in our podcast: https://workingclasshistory.com/2020/06/17/e39-the-spanish-civil-war-an-introduction/
Pictured: group of women including the 13 Roses https://www.facebook.com/workingclasshistory/photos/a.296224173896073/1493458187505993/?type=3

Can we say FUCK FRANCO!

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Acabo de veure la pallissa que li han fet 13 d’extrema dreta, amb bats, a un noi al carrer Balmes i tbh? estic sense paraules

useless-catalanfacts:

Jo igual. Era d’esperar, ja hem vist en altres ocasions el que volen fer. Però igualment, collons.

Groups of Spanish supremacists are out tonight “hunting Catalan independentists” (their own words). This is how they treated a boy in the streets of Barcelona:

And what’s worse is that neonazis never have to face the legal consequences, because the Spanish government supports them.

In the group of neonazis that murdered Guillem Agulló, most never even went to jail since murdering a Catalan/Valencian is not considered a hate crime even when the aggressors clearly say that is the reason. And the ones in the group of murderers who did went to prison were released early for “good behaviour”.

Meanwhile, pro-independence activists like Jordi Sànchez and Jordi Cuixart have already spent 2 years in prison for “organising” (they didn’t even organise it) a peaceful demonstration. And they are sentenced to 9 more years in prison.

Spain is a fascist state. And Catalonia wants no part in it. We are leaving.

So, who does want to be ruled by Madrid?

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historium:

Lieutenant Colonel Antonio Tejero waving a pistol in the Spanish Congress of Deputies during an attempted coup against the government, Madrid, February 23, 1981

The 1981 Spanish coup d’état attempt, known in Spain by the numeronym 23-F and also known as the Tejerazo was an attempted coup d’état in Spain on 23 February 1981. Lieutenant-Colonel Antonio Tejero led 200 armed Civil Guard officers into the Congress of Deputies during the vote to elect a Prime Minister. The officers held the parliamentarians and ministers hostage for 18 hours, during which time King Juan Carlos I denounced the coup in a televised address, calling for rule of law and the democratic government to continue. Though shots were fired, the hostage-takers surrendered the next morning without killing anyone.

The most immediate consequence was that, as an institution, the Monarchy emerged from the failed coup with overwhelming legitimacy in the eyes of the public and the political class. In the long term, the coup’s failure could be considered the last serious attempt by adherents to Francoist ideology to destroy Spain’s future as a democracy and implement their fascist totalitarian designs on the nation.

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historium:

Lieutenant Colonel Antonio Tejero waving a pistol in the Spanish Congress of Deputies during an attempted coup against the government, Madrid, February 23, 1981

The 1981 Spanish coup d’état attempt, known in Spain by the numeronym 23-F and also known as the Tejerazo was an attempted coup d’état in Spain on 23 February 1981. Lieutenant-Colonel Antonio Tejero led 200 armed Civil Guard officers into the Congress of Deputies during the vote to elect a Prime Minister. The officers held the parliamentarians and ministers hostage for 18 hours, during which time King Juan Carlos I denounced the coup in a televised address, calling for rule of law and the democratic government to continue. Though shots were fired, the hostage-takers surrendered the next morning without killing anyone.

The most immediate consequence was that, as an institution, the Monarchy emerged from the failed coup with overwhelming legitimacy in the eyes of the public and the political class. In the long term, the coup’s failure could be considered the last serious attempt by adherents to Francoist ideology to destroy Spain’s future as a democracy and implement their fascist totalitarian designs on the nation.

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beautiful-basque-country:

workingclasshistory:

On this day, 20 December 1973, Spanish fascist Prime Minister who was hand-picked as Franco’s successor Luis Carrero Blanco was assassinated in Madrid. Basque separatists ETA had spent five months digging a tunnel under a road he went down to attend mass. They then detonated a bomb as he drove over, shooting his car 20 metres into the air and over a five-storey building, earning Blanco the nickname of “Spain’s first astronaut”. His successor was unable to hold together different factions of the government, and was credited by some of helping accelerate the restoration of democracy after Franco’s death.
We only post highlights on here, for all our anniversaries follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/wrkclasshistory
Pictured: a cinematic creation of the event https://ift.tt/2rOwulk

Voló, voló…

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