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A Comparison: The British Pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Trooper’s Sword and the Austrian Model 1769 Heavy Cavalry Pallasch 

The British P1796 Heavy Cavalry Trooper’s Sword is probably best known as the sword of Richard Sharpe from the popular book series by Bernard Cornwell. In 1796 both heavy and light cavalry adopted new sword patterns. John Gaspard Le Marchant is credited with the creation of these sword patterns, as well as producing a manual on the use of the cavalry sword. The light cavalry sword is a bit more original in its design than the heavy cavalry sword, as the heavy cavalry sword was based on the earlier Austrian M1769 HC Pallasch. The Austrian M1769 is rather rare, at least in my area of the world, so it is not often that one can see the British and Austrian swords side by side. Thank you to Ivan B. at Sword Forum International for allowing me to share photos of his swords! 

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Pattern 1820 1st Life Guards Trooper’s Sword

95.5cm blade, regulation steel hilt with bowl guard engraved and pierced with crown over the regimental cypher, the border decorated with 12 brass studs (one missing), wire bound fish skin grip (wire binding A/F), in its steel scabbard, complete with buff leather sword knot.

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British Pattern 1890 Cavalry Trooper’s Sword for the Princess Louise Dragoon Guards (Canada)

This sabre was used by a trooper of the Princess Louise Dragoon Guards, a regiment based in Ottawa and created in 1872. The regiment contributed volunteers to the Boer War and the First World War.

This sabre was made in 1898 by Mole. It appears to be marked to the 5th Dragoon Guards, a regiment created in 1903, which would indicate that the regiment did not adopt the 1899 sabre. It is in near pristine shape, with only a few discolourations and minimal wear to the leather grip. The sword knot, which rarely survives, is in great shape.

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