petermorwood:

pileofknives:

sioltach:

thetuberculosisgay:

femme-coquette:

luisonte:

Yo como profe de historia

love this

Mutuals do this

this is exactly what I envision everytime I read that some ancient civilization trained their little kids for battle

There’s a kid in the front row with a Titus Pullo mindset. See what I mean:

That “Rome” clip just had a shield wall, so here’s the testudo (turtle) scene from “The Eagle”.

In fact the Roman army had a proper tactic
which didn’t involve “Fall back!” or “Run!”

for dealing with cavalry attacks – including chariots, which weren’t common and mostly weren’t used like this anyway, being either battle-taxis for nobility who would then dismount, or mobile archery platforms. 

That Roman tactic was (surprise!) a modified testudo bristling with spearpoints – imagine this small re-enactment squad as a 500-man cohort…

image

…so was actually more like a hedgehog…

image

…which as everyone knows can never be buggered at all, or at least only after the most determined effort.

Arrangements like this only worked if everyone kept formation. Are you listening, Pullo? (And you too, kid in the front rank!)

PzKpfw NbFz V and VI’s designs were very similar to the British Vickers “Independent” tank, Soviet T-35, French Char-2C and proved to be too complex to produce. Only two prototypes were built by Rheinmetall in 1934. In Spring of 1939, Krupp’s PzKpfw NbFz VI was shown at the International Automobile Exposition in Berlin. After a stint as a propaganda piece, it ended its days in occupied Norway.